Tulsa Metro

Tulsa, Oklahoma ***

Tulsa is the second-largest city in the state of Oklahoma and 47th-most populous city in the United States. As of July 2015, the population was 403,505, an increase of 11,599 over that reported in the 2010 Census.[5] It is the principal municipality of the Tulsa Metropolitan Area, a region with 981,005 residents in the MSA and 1,151,172 in the CSA.[6] The city serves as the county seat of Tulsa County, the most densely populated county in Oklahoma,[7] with urban development extending into OsageRogers, and Wagoner counties.[5]

Economy

Traditionally, Tulsa’s economy has been led by the energy industry. The United States Oil and Gas Association, formerly the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association, was founded in Tulsa on October 13, 1917, six months after the entry of the United States into World War I. At the time Tulsa called itself “The Oil Capital of the World”. At its creation, the association worked to provide petroleum to the Allied forces. In the decades since its establishment, the association is recognized as a leading advocate for producers of domestic oil and gas.[82]

Over the city’s history many large oil companies have been headquartered in the city, including Warren Petroleum (which merged with Gulf Oil in what was then the largest merger in the energy industry), Skelly OilGetty Oil and CITGO. In addition, ConocoPhillips was headquartered in nearby Bartlesville. Industry consolidation and increased offshore drilling threatened Tulsa’s status as an oil capital, but new drilling techniques and the rise of natural gas has buoyed the growth of the city’s energy sector.

Today, Tulsa is again home to the headquarters of many international oil and gas-related companies, including Williams CompaniesSemGroupONE GasSyntroleumONEOKLaredo PetroleumSamson ResourcesHelmerich & PayneMagellan Midstream PartnersWPX Energy, and Excel Energy.

 

History

The area where Tulsa now exists was considered Indian Territory when it was first formally settled by the Lochapoka and Creek tribes in 1836.[18]They established a small settlement under the Creek Council Oak Tree at the present day intersection of Cheyenne Avenue and 18th Street. This area and this tree reminded Chief Tukabahchi and his small group of trail of tear survivors of the bend in the river and their previous Creek Council Oak Tree back in the Talisi, Alabama area. They named their new settlement Tallasi, meaning “old town” in the Creek language, which later became “Tulsa”.[18] The area around Tulsa was also settled by members of the other so-called “Five Civilized Tribes” who had been relocated to Oklahoma from the Southern United States. Most of modern Tulsa is located in the Creek Nation, with parts located in the Cherokee Nation and Osage Nation.

Culture

Tulsa is home to several internationally renowned museums. Located in the former villa of oil pioneer Waite Phillips in Midtown Tulsa, the Philbrook Museum of Art is considered one of the top 50 fine art museums in the United States, and is one of only five to offer a combination of a historic home, formal gardens, and an art collection.[99] The museum’s expansive collection includes work by a diverse group of artists including Pablo PicassoAndrew WyethGiovanni BelliniDomenico di Pace BeccafumiWillem de KooningWilliam Merritt ChaseAuguste Rodin and Georgia O’Keeffe. Philbrook also maintains a satellite campus in downtown Tulsa.

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*** The text of this page is an abridgment of a Wikipedia article on Tulsa. The full article can be found here.