Oklahoma City Metro

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma***

Oklahoma City, often shortened to OKC, is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The county seat of Oklahoma County,[9] the city ranks 27th among United States cities in population. The population grew following the 2010 Census, with the population estimated to have increased to 631,346 as of July 2015.[6] As of 2015, the Oklahoma City metropolitan area had a population of 1,358,452,[10] and the Oklahoma City-Shawnee Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,459,758 (Chamber of Commerce) residents,[10] making it Oklahoma’s largest metropolitan area.

Economy

The economy of Oklahoma City, once just a regional power center of government and energy exploration, has since diversified to include the sectors of information technology, serviceshealth services and administration. The city is headquarters to two Fortune 500 companies, Chesapeake Energy Corporation[72] and Devon Energy Corporation,as well as being home to Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores, which is ranked thirteenth on Forbes‘ list of private companies.

Education

The city is home to several colleges and universities. Oklahoma City University, formerly known as Epworth University, was founded by the United Methodist Church on September 1, 1904 and is known for its performing arts, science, mass communications, business, law, and athletic programs. OCU has its main campus in the north-central section of the city, near the city’s Chinatown area. OCU Law is in the Midtown district near downtown, in the old Central High School building.

The University of Oklahoma has several institutions of higher learning in the city and metropolitan area, with OU Medicine and the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campuses east of downtown in the Oklahoma Health Center district, and the main campus to the south in the suburb of Norman. The OU Medicine hosting the state’s only Level-One trauma center. OU Health Sciences Center is one of the nation’s largest independent medical centers, employing more than 12,000 people.[100] OU is one of only four major universities in the nation to operate six medical schools.

 

History

Oklahoma City was settled on April 22,[13] 1889, when the area known as the “Unassigned Lands” was opened for settlement in an event known as “The Land Run“.[14] Some 10,000 homesteaders settled the area that would become the capital of Oklahoma. The town grew quickly; the population doubled between 1890 and 1900.[15] Early leaders of the development of the city included Anton Classen, John Shartel, Henry Overholser and James W. Maney.

By the time Oklahoma was admitted to the Union in 1907, Oklahoma City had surpassed Guthrie, the territorial capital, as the new state’s population center and commercial hub. Soon after, the capital was moved from Guthrie to Oklahoma City.[16] Oklahoma City was a major stop on Route 66 during the early part of the 20th century; it was prominently mentioned in Bobby Troup‘s 1946 jazz classic, “(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66” made famous by artist Nat King Cole.

Culture

The Donald W. Reynolds Visual Arts Center is the new downtown home for the Oklahoma City Museum of Art. The museum features visiting exhibits, original selections from its own collection, a theater showing a variety of foreign, independent, and classic films each week, and a restaurant. OKCMOA is also home to the most comprehensive collection of Chihuly glass in the world including the 55-foot Eleanor Blake Kirkpatrick Memorial Tower in the Museum’s atrium.[86] The art deco Civic Center Music Hall, which was totally renovated in 2001, has performances from the Oklahoma City Ballet, the Oklahoma City Opera, the Oklahoma City Philharmonic and also various concerts and traveling Broadway shows.

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*** The text of this page is an abridgment of a Wikipedia article on Oklahoma City. The full article can be found here.